Tag Archives: methodology

3D Modelling Techniques

When we hear 3D modelling, we tend to think either that the model was created by hand in something like AutoCAD or by scanning an object with lasers to get its exact dimensions. But there are actually a number of … Continue reading

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Bead Design: Take 2

You may remember that back in October, I started to write a series of posts about documenting the designs of polychrome beads. I started to describe my system, and then promptly fell into one of the busiest three months of … Continue reading

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Stripes, Swirls, and Squiggles: Line Styles

Line style is a fairly straightforward category. This basically describes the pattern of any lines that decorate the bead – not the pattern those lines make, but the pattern they have. There are only a few options for this. First … Continue reading

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Stripes, Swirls, and Squiggles: Design Shape

Aside from the number of colours involved in the design, the first element I record is the shape itself. This can be any design that isn’t a line, like eyes, flowers, spirals, stars, fish, birds, etc. The simplest shape is … Continue reading

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Stripes, Swirls, and Squiggles: Documenting Bead Designs

Documenting design is a highly complex thing to do. Yesterday’s post talked only about eye beads, but we saw that there is a large variety of what might be called eye beads in the archaeological record. So how do we … Continue reading

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Diaphaneity

Diaphaneity is the catchall term for opaque, translucent, or transparent. Opaque means that when you shine a light through the object, it doesn’t shine through to the other side (like a piece of metal). Translucent means that the light does … Continue reading

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Documenting Polychrome Beads

So far, we’ve been talking about monochrome beads and how to document their color. But that’s not the only type of bead we find – roughly 10-15% of the beads I come across are polychrome, or have multiple colors. If … Continue reading

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Clear and White Beads

I’ve lumped these two together because they’re both lacking color. One is translucent/transparent and the other is opaque, but their color status is the same. These beads can be glass, rock crystal, pearl, shell, bone, ivory, and a number of … Continue reading

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Color and Lighting

I’ve mentioned a number of times how the lighting on or behind a bead can change its color. Black beads are actually cobalt blue, purple, green, or even hot pink when view with an LED light shining through. Brown beads … Continue reading

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Alert: Beads Can Change Color

Yes, you read that correctly: beads can change color. I’ve touched on this a little in previous posts, but let’s really look at the issue here. I don’t mean that the color changes depending on the light, like I talked … Continue reading

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